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What Works for Women at Work References

Gender-and race-based standards of competence: lower minimum standards but higher ability standards for devalued groups

Biernat, M., & Kobrynowicz, D. (1997). Gender-and race-based standards of competence: lower minimum standards but higher ability standards for devalued groups. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 72(3), 544.
 

Can angry women get ahead? Gender, status conferral, and workplace emotion expression

Brescoll, V. L., & Uhlmann, E. L. (2008). Can angry women get ahead? Gender, status conferral, and workplace emotion expression. Psychological Science, 19, 268–275.
 

Warmth and competence as universal dimensions of social perception: The stereotype content model and the BIAS map

Cuddy, A. J., Fiske, S. T., & Glick, P. (2008). Warmth and competence as universal dimensions of social perception: The stereotype content model and the BIAS map. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 40, 61-149.
 

Self-promotion as a risk factor for women: The costs and benefits of counterstereotypical impression management

Rudman, L. A. (1998). Self-promotion as a risk factor for women: The costs and benefits of counterstereotypical impression management. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 74, 629-645.
 

Normative discrimination and the motherhood penalty

Correll, S. J., & Benard S. (2010). Normative discrimination and the motherhood penalty. Gender & Society, 24(5), 616-646.
 

Do sexist organizational cultures create the Queen Bee?

Derks, B., Ellemers, N., van Laar, C., & de Groot, K. (2011). Do sexist organizational cultures create the Queen Bee?. British Journal of Social Psychology, 50(3), 519-535.

 

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